This Nearly “Impossible to Trace” Spyware is Used by 32 Governments to Spy on Us. Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS and COMPUTER fixed both Windows and Mac

Short Bytes: In 2015, the infamous spyware FinFisher is spread in 32 countries to perform advanced citizen surveillance. Citizen Lab, a security watchdog, has uncovered the nearly untraceable IP addresses and servers of the spyware. Read more and find out how it works and if it’s used by your government.

The preying eyes of your government are more active than ever and it’s using more advanced tools for surveillance purposes. Recently in the data breach at the Hacking Team, it was revealed that multiple governments contacted them to obtain spyware tools.

One such famous product in the spyware market is FinFisher, also known as FinSpy. This surveillance software came into the limelight in 2014, when a hacking attack at its marketing company Gamma International exposed it to the world.

One year after the hack, this sophisticated computer software suite, sold exclusively to governments and law enforcement agencies, is alive and serving more customers than ever. This suite is used to target computers or phones, and monitor all activities including calls, emails and messages.

Citizen Lab, a security watchdog, has published a new report unmasking the true locations of the master servers to identify the governments using FinFisher. The firm scanned the internet for FinFisher servers and separated masters from proxies and located 32 governments and 10 entities that are directly related to FinFisher.

The lab has been able to identify these servers that are claimed to be practically impossible to trace by the spyware makers.

finfisher-5

Governments using FinFisher include those of Mongolia, Kazakhstan, South Africa, Oman, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Nigeria, Mexico, Spain, Venezuela and other. Many suspected governments using FinFisher spyware have past records of human rights violations.

Citizen Lab researchers write than each instance of FinFisher includes the address of a command and control server that the spyware reports back to.

finfisher-5

“These C&C servers are typically FinSpy Relays, which forward connections back and forth between a device infected with FinFisher, and a FinSpy Master.  The purpose of the FinSpy Relay is explicitly to make it “practically impossible” (their emphasis) for a researcher to discover “the location and country of the Headquarter,” Citizen Lab writes.

The researchers were able to find some connection between Hacking Team and FinFisher IP addresses. Instead of being competitors, both of them shared some common clients.

finfisher-5

They collected a total of 135 IP addresses belonging to FinFisher boxes, but not all of them were pointing back to one specific country. “So there’s definitely more customers,” one of the researchers Marczak told Motherboard.

“In presenting our scan results, we do not wish to disrupt or interfere with legitimately sanctioned investigations or other activities. Instead, we hope to ensure that citizens have the opportunity to hold their governments transparent and accountable,” writes Citizen Lab in its report.

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KNOW HOW TO MAKE THE KEYBOARD OF YOUR COMPUTER DANCE? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

Today i will be showing you an interesting trick which will let your keyboard led light to dance. Basicly we will be creating a vbscript to make caps lock, num lock and scroll lock to perform this trick. So lets get started.

     How to do that ?

        1. Open Notepad and copy below codes into it.

Set wshShell =wscript.CreateObject(“WScript.Shell”)dowscript.sleep 100wshshell.sendkeys “{CAPSLOCK}”wshshell.sendkeys “{NUMLOCK}”wshshell.sendkeys “{SCROLLLOCK}”loop

              

2. Then save this file as led.vbs (.vbs is must)       3. Open your save file and see your keyboard led blinking like disco lights.

     How to disable blinking Led ?

1. First open Task Manager [ctrl+alt+del ]

2. Then Go to process tab.

3. Select wscript.exe 

4. Click on End process.

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KNOW HOW TO CHANGE THE IP ADDRESS OF YOUR PC OR LAPTOP IN LESS THAN 1 MINUTE? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

In my previous post i had show you how to Grab someone ip address now i will show you how to change ip address in less then a minute. For now it will take 2 to 3 minutes but with some practice you can do this within a minute.

  • Click on “Start” in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  • Click on “RUN
  • Type in “command” and click OK

  You should be now at MSDOS prompt Screen

  • Type “ipconfig /release” just like that, and press “enter
  • Type “exit” and leave the prompt
  • Right-click on “Network Places” or “My Network Places” on your desktop.
  • Click on “properties

Now you should  be on a screen with something titled “Local Area Connection”, or something  similar to that, and, if you have a network hooked up, all of your other networks.

  •  Right click on “Local Area Connection” and click “properties
  • Double-click on the “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)” from the list under the “General” tab
  • Click on “Use the following IP address” under the “General” tab
  • Create an IP address (It doesn’t matter what it is)
  • Press “Tab” and it should automatically fill in the “Subnet Mask” section with default numbers.
  • Press the “Ok” button here
  • Hit the “Ok” button again

 Now you should be back to the “Local Area Connection” screen.

  • Right-click back on “Local Area Connection” and go to properties again.
  • Go back to the “TCP/IP” settings
  • This time, select “Obtain an IP address automatically
  • Click on “Ok
  • Hit “Ok” again.
  • Now you have a New IP address.

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Beware: A Dangerous Windows 10 Ransomware Scam Is Spreading Online. Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

windows10-blue-sign_large

Short Bytes : A Windows 10 Ransomware scam has been reported. This phishing scam sends fake emails that look just like ones from Microsoft, encouraging the users to download a .zip file for Windows 10 installation.

Windows 10 is now released and people are installing it on their PCs in huge numbers. According to the media reports, more than 67 million people have installed Windows 10 on their PCs. For those who were left behind in the upgrade process, Microsoft even decided to help them out with Windows 10 media creation tool. Unfortunately, scammers are taking the advantage of the desperation of Windows users- that has resulted in a newly reported Windows 10 ransomware scam.

How does this Windows 10 Ransomware target users?

They have found a new scamming campaign that spreads CTB-Locker ransomware. This trouble comes in the form of a fake Microsoft email, telling Windows users that their Windows 10download is ready.

These messages in Windows 10 ransomware scam mimic the emails sent by Microsoft, along with some text mistakes and changes. However, scammers have managed to spoof the address of origin as update@microsoft.com. To make the messages look more authentic, attackers are using the same color scheme used by Microsoft to fool the users. Thus, these emails look more legitimate.

ctb_locker-windows-10-ransomware-1

The mail is also coupled with a Microsoft disclaimer and a message that files are virus-free. The origin of these emails has been traced back to Thailand.

What will happen if you run the CTB-Locker file?

Falling into this Windows 10 Ransomware trap, users download the .zip attachment. After extracting the files and run the executable program, your computer will be immediately locked by CTB-Locker ransomware. This ransomware tells the users to submit the payment within 96 hours, and failing to do so will result in the permanent encryption of PC files.

ctb_locker-windows-10-ransomware-1

CTB-Locker uses elliptical curve encryption which provides same private/public key encryption with a different kind of algorithm. This new algorithm results in lower overhead and same security at a smaller key space.

This Windows 10 ransomware threat will increase until the attackers find new ways to monetize the compromised PCs. It advises the users to store their data as an offline backup. This Windows 10 ransomware phishing attack shows that such launches and events are targeted to trap users.

Don’t forget to check out our special coverage of Windows 10. Did you find this story helpful? Tell us in comments below.

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10 Ways to Protect Against HACKER’s. Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

hacker

It’s pitch black. You peer into the backseat of your car. There’s no one there. Still, you can’t shake an uneasy feeling as you slip into the driver’s side. Turning your key in the ignition, you glance one last time into the backseat, and there he is…the hacker trying to kill your computer.

Hackers are a scary bunch—whether working as part of a criminal syndicate or an idealist with a political agenda, they’ve got the knowledge and the power to access your most precious data. So instead of sitting back and waiting to get infected, why not arm yourself and fight back? Bad guys, beware. We’ve got 10 ways to beat you.

  1. Update your OS and other software frequently, if not automatically. This keeps hackers from accessing your computer through vulnerabilities in outdated programs. For extra protection, enable Microsoft product updates so that the Office Suite will be updated at the same time. Consider retiring particularly susceptible software such as Java or Flash.
  2. Download up-to-date security programs, including antivirus and anti-malware software, anti-spyware, and a firewall (if your OS didn’t come pre-packaged with it). To trick even the most villainous hackers, consider investing in anti-exploit technology, EMAIL us on oomikatechnology@gmail.com and get ANTI VIRUS FREE for 15 Months so you can stop attacks before they happen.
  3. Destroy all traces of your personal info on hardware you plan on selling. Consider using d-ban to erase your hard drive. For those looking to pillage your recycled devices, this makes information much more difficult to recover. If the information you’d like to protect is critical enough, the best tool for the job is a chainsaw.
  4. Do not use open wifi; it makes it too easy for hackers to steal your connection and download illegal files. Protect your wifi with an encrypted password, and consider refreshing your equipment every few years. Some routers have vulnerabilities that are never patched. Newer routers allow you to provide guests with segregated wireless access. Plus, they make frequent password changes easier.
  5. Speaking of passwords: password protect all of your devices, including your desktop, laptop, phone, smartwatch, tablet, camera, lawnmower…you get the idea. The ubiquity of mobile devices makes them especially vulnerable. Lock your phone and make the timeout fairly short. Use fingerprint lock for the iPhone and passkey or swipe for Android.

    “It’s easy to forget that mobile devices are essentially small computers that just happen to fit in your pocket and can be used as a phone. “Your mobile device contains a veritable treasure trove of personal information and, once unlocked, can lead to devastating consequences.”

  6. Sensing a pattern here? Create difficult passwords and change them frequently. In addition, never use the same passwords across multiple services. If that’s as painful as a stake to a vampire’s heart, use a password manager like LastPass.

    For extra hacker protectant, ask about two-step authentication. Several services have only recently started to offer two-factor authentication, and they require the user to initiate the process. Trust us, the extra friction is worth it. Two-factor authentication makes taking over an account that much more difficult, and on the flip side, much easier to reclaim should the worst happen.

  7. Come up with creative answers for your security questions. People can now figure out your mother’s maiden name or where you graduated from high school with a simple Google search. Consider answering like a crazy person. If Bank of America asks, “What was the name of your first boyfriend/girlfriend?” reply “your mom.” Just don’t forget that’s how you answered when they ask you again.
  8. Practice smart surfing and emailing. Phishing campaigns still exist, but hackers have become much cleverer than that Nigerian prince who needs your money. Hover over links to see the actual email address from which the email was sent. Is it really from the person or company claiming to send them? If you’re not sure, pay attention to awkward sentence construction and formatting. If something still seems fishy, do a quick search on the Internet for the subject line. Others may have been scammed and posted about it online.
  9. Don’t link accounts. If you want to comment on an article and you’re prompted to sign in with Twitter or Facebook, do not go behind the door. “Convenience always lessens your security posture,”. “Linking accounts allows services to acquire a staggering amount of personal information.”
  10. Keep sensitive data off the cloud. “No matter which way you cut it, data stored on the cloud doesn’t belong to you,” says Taggart. “There are very few cloud storage solutions that offer encryption for ‘data at rest.’ Use the cloud accordingly. If it’s important, don’t.”
  • Honorable mention: Alarmist webpages announcing that there are “critical errors” on your computer are lies. Microsoft will never contact you in person to remove threats. These messages come from scammers, and if you allow them to remotely connect to your computer, they could try to steal your information and your money. If that’s not a Nightmare on Elm Street, then we don’t know what is.
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LEARN HOW TO HIDE FILES BEHIND THE IMAGES? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

There are some important  files or document you want to hide from others on your computer.

  To do that you might be creating folder inside folder to hide such files but in todays tutorial i will change this by teaching you a interesting trick to hide files behindimages.To hide a file behind a image  means that if any one opens that image he will see the image, but to see the hidden file we need to open that image in a specific way. So lets get started.

How To Hide File Behind Image ?

In order to do this you should have basic understanding of command line.

1. Select an image to be used for hiding file behind the image.

2. Now select a file to hide behind the image and make it in .RAR format. With the help of the WinRAR.

3. And most important is that paste both the files on desktop. You may do this anywhere instead of desktop if you have some basic understanding of command line.

4. Now open cmd by going to Start > Accessories Command Prompt and type following commands in it.

cd desktop

5. CD stands for change directory by typing above command you change your directory to desktop. After that type command given below.

 Copy /b imagename.jpg + filename.rar finalimage.jpg

  • Replace imagename.jpg with the name of image you want your file to be hidden behind. Don’t forget to add image format (Eg: .jpg,.png,.gif)
  • Replace filename with name of your file you want to hide. It must be in .rarformat.
  • Finally Replace finalimage.jpg with whatever name you want your final image with hidden files should be. This is the image where your file will be hidden.

6. Now when you will try to open this newly created image it will open as normal image, but to open you hidden file you need follow steps given below.

How To Access Hidden File ?

To access your hidden file you need to open the newly created image in winrar. Just follow simple steps given below to do that.

1. Open winrar

2. Now locate your image and open it or simply drag your image in winrar.

3. Extract the file and done.

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KNOW HOW TO PASSWORD PROTECT ANY FOLDER WITHOUT ANY SOFTWARE? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

In my previous post i had taught you to hide files behind images. In this tutorial i will show you interesting and useful trick to password protect folder without using any software using batch file programming. This trick will work on all windows platform (Win XP, Win 7).

Follow below tutorial to learn this trick.

How To Lock Folder ?

1. Open Notepad and Copy code given below into it.

cls@ECHO OFFtitle coolhacking-tricks.blogspot.comif EXIST “Control Panel.{21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}” gotoUNLOCKif NOT EXIST MyFolder goto MDMyFolder:CONFIRMecho Are you sure to lock this folder? (Y/N)set/p “cho=>”if %cho%==Y goto LOCKif %cho%==y goto LOCKif %cho%==n goto ENDif %cho%==N goto ENDecho Invalid choice.goto CONFIRM:LOCKren MyFolder “Control Panel.{21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}”attrib +h +s “Control Panel.{21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}”echo Folder lockedgoto End:UNLOCKecho Enter password to Unlock Your Secure Folderset/p “pass=>”if NOT %pass%== coolhacks goto FAILattrib -h -s “Control Panel.{21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}”ren “Control Panel.{21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}” MyFolderecho Folder Unlocked successfullygoto End:FAILecho Invalid passwordgoto end:MDMyFoldermd MyFolderecho MyFolder created successfullygoto End:End

2. Save the notepad file as lock.bat (.bat is must)

3. Now double click on lock.bat and a new folder will be created with name MyFolder

4. Copy all your data you want to protect in that New folder

5. Now double click on lock.bat and when command promp appears Type Y and press enter.

6. Now MyFolder will be hidden from you view, to access that folde double click on lock.bat

7. It will ask for password enter your password and done. (Default password is coolhacks)

  • To change the password replace coolhacks with  new password in the above code

How To Further Secure ?

You might be thinking that anyone can access the password by opening that lock.bat file in Notepad or any other text editor. To make it more secure hide lock.bat in some secure location after following the above tutorial To access the secured file double click on lock.bat. I would suggest copying lock.bat file into Pendrive and copying it into your computer whenever you required to access to your protected files.

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SO YOUR EMAIL WAS HACKED. NOW WHAT? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

A compromised email account doesn’t mean your other accounts have been compromised. But I would assume the worst and take immediate action.

The person who hacked your account is probably in Nigeria. That’s where most scams like this originate. So, you have to wonder how the hacker got your log-in information.

The hacker doesn’t know you. So, he probably didn’t guess your password. For the same reason, your password probably wasn’t reset.

You could have been tricked by a phishing email. Or, in a worst-case scenario, you have a keylogger on your machine. Keyloggers record your keystrokes. Some even take screen shots.

A keylogger wouldn’t limit itself to email passwords. It would record everything you do on the machine. It could capture credit card numbers, banking passwords and other log-in information.

Get to work fast. Start by securing your machine. You need one firewall and one antivirus program. You also need at least two anti-spyware programs. Get all of this for free from my site.

Once you have the software installed, update it. You need to have the latest malware definitions. Then, run the programs one by one. They should detect and remove malware on your machine. I wouldn’t be surprised if you find a keylogger.

You should also run Windows Update. This installs security patches for Windows and other Microsoft software. Keeping software updated is just as important as running security software.

Flaws in other software can also open your machine to hackers. So run Secunia’s Software Inspector. It will check for updates for other installed programs.

My tip covers everything you need to know about Software Inspector.

Securing your computer is only the beginning. Now you need to protect all of your online accounts.

You should change your password at every site you’ve visited on that machine. I recommend making a list of the sites you use. Go through your bookmarks and Web history, if need be. This will help you cover all bases.

When you create new passwords, make sure they’re strong. What’s a strong password? My tip explains all. You’ll probably also want a password manager. It will help you remember all of your passwords.

I recommend the free KeePass program. You can download it from my site. But first, make sure you know how to use it. My tip provides step-by-step instructions.

There is a chance that you could fall victim to identity theft. So, you need to take some steps to protect yourself. I recently wrote a handy column on protecting your identity. Read it and follow the steps. You’ll be glad you did.

Now, all of this assumes that a keylogger is on your machine. But, maybe you remember entering your email password on a suspicious site.

Should you go through all these steps if you fell victim to a phishing attack? You betcha! Many phishing sites install malicious software—especially keyloggers.

Besides, think about the information that could be in your email account. There could be plenty of sensitive data. It’s best to play it safe.

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DO YOU KNOW THAT INTERNET EXPLORER CAN ALLOW HACKERS TO TAKE OVER YOUR COMPUTER? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

It seems like we’ve been here so many times before. Security researchers are once again warning about a serious flaw in Internet Explorer that could allow hackers to take over your computer remotely.

You may have heard that last week hackers broke into a Department of Labor website. The hackers reprogrammed the site to target this exact flaw on the computers of anyone who visited.So, the bottom line is that hackers know about this flaw, and it’s being actively exploited. Even up-to-date security software might not protect you. Not good news!

Fortunately, this flaw is a problem only in Internet Explorer 8. I know many of you use other Web browsers, but you probably know someone who still uses IE8. Please pass this warning on to them so their computer isn’t compromised.

Not sure what browser you use? This site will tell you in a second. Not sure what a browser is? No worries; I’ve got an explanation right here.

At this time, Microsoft doesn’t have a fix for the security flaw. Your best bet if you’re running IE 8 is to upgrade to Internet Explorer 9 or 10, or switch Web browsers.

In fact, I constantly recommend that people do this anyway. Not only is Internet Explorer 8 weak in the security department – and getting worse as time passes – it also lacks support for the latest Web standards.

If you want to get the most out of the modern Internet, and make things more pleasant for Web developers everywhere, upgrading is a good idea.

If you’re running Windows Vista or 7, upgrading is as simple as going to Windows Update and selecting the Internet Explorer 9 update (Windows 7 users can upgrade to IE10). Learn more about using Windows Update here.

Windows XP users can’t upgrade any higher than Internet Explorer 8. That means you’ll need to use a different browser instead. Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome are both free, and you can use the latest versions, which are as fast and secure as Internet Explorer 10 – even more in some cases.

As a side note, if you are using Windows XP, you should start planning for your computer’s future. XP’s end of life is coming up fast. Find out what that means and how it will affect you.

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A FAST PORTABLE DOCUMENT SCANNER. Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

Are you drowning in a sea of paperwork? Invoices, receipts, notes, business cards and bills are just a few documents that come to mind. You can’t throw them away, but you don’t want them cluttering up your house. I suggest digitizing them and keeping them in a centralized location.

You can do so with CamScanner. It uses your mobile gadget’s camera to scan all types of documents. With it, you can crop, auto-enhance, save as a PDF, share and upload to a location of your choice.

What’s more, CamScanner supports four different types of Cloud storage services, so you can take your documents wherever you go.

Cost: Free

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5 EASY TRICKS TO BOOST YOUR HOME WI-FI? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

It’s easy to take a smoothly functioning home wireless network for granted, especially when you’re sipping coffee on the patio and catching up on the news of the morning with your iPad.

You can faintly hear your family – camped out at the kitchen table – tapping away on keyboards.All is right with the world.Few things in digital life are more frustrating, however, than when a home wireless network goes haywire. It’s painfully slow. The signal is weak and connections drop. Your comfy sofa is a Wi-Fi dead spot.

Try these tricks to boost your wireless router’s range and speed – and you’ll soon be taking your Wi-Fi for granted again.

1. Update your technology If your router, computer and gadgets were made in the last two or three years, they probably support the latest wireless-N standard. If so, make sure your router is set to N-only mode for maximum speed and range. The b/g/n setting – needed to support older devices – will be slower.If your PC is getting on in years and stuck at wireless-G, consider upgrading to a new model or a new wireless-N card.Buy a new router if it doesn’t support wireless-N. Chances are, it also doesn’t support the latest security encryption.Make sure your computer is running the latest version of its operating system and has the latest driver for your router.Visit your router manufacturer’s website to see if you’ve missed a firmware upgrade. I bet you have.

2. Find the sweet spot Routers aren’t the best looking gadgets, so your inclination may be to hide them. That’s a bad idea because routers are susceptible to overheating and need good airflow.The devices also perform much better when placed in an open, central location – away from walls and obstructions, such as metal filing cabinets.If you place a router that has an omnidirectional antenna against an outside wall, it will send half its wireless signal outdoors. That might create a dead spot on the opposite side of your home.A high location is usually better than a low one, especially if you have a two-story home. If you can, put the router on a high shelf or on top of a cabinet.

3. Change the channel Like radio stations, wireless routers can broadcast on a number of different channels. When you and half the neighborhood are on the same channel, it causes a lot of static.This shouldn’t be a problem if your router features automatic channel selection. If it doesn’t, tune in a channel with less interference. Consult your router’s manual for quick assistance in changing router channels.

4. Reduce interferenceAnother nice thing about having a newer router is that it is probably a dual band. The 5 GHz frequency reduces interference from 2.4 GHz cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors and other common wireless gadgets.Microwave ovens also emit a very strong signal in the 2.4 GHz band.Put some extra distance between your router and interfering appliances.

5. Pop open a beer If you’ve tried all this and your router still doesn’t have enough reach, it’s time for the trusty beer-can hack.This involves cutting a beer or soda can open with a utility knife to make a parabolic antenna out of it. I know, it sounds a little crazy, but this trick can boost your network by two bars or more. It’s easy. And I made a fun video to show you exactly how to do it. Watch it now.

Finally, once your home Wi-Fi is humming along again, don’t forget to secure your network. Encryption has little effect on the performance of newer routers.

 Why does it matter? If your network is open, neighbors can piggyback on to it to do their Internet surfing – and that will really slow you down. Worse, hackers can exploit your unsecured network and snoop for personal data.Be sure to use the latest WPA2 encryption and create a strong password.

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FAKE BANK SCAM’s? Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS.

The Lads set up web sites with more or less sophistication which mimic those of real banks, or create ‘identities’ for banks which don’t exist. Examples sent by Kindly Contributors appear below, most recent ones first. The Financial Times (3/3/2003) described actual penetration of banks by scammers as staff.

                        List of dubious institutions mentioned:

http://www.bkoa-ci.net/

http://www.leedmerchant.com

http://www.eurolinkfinance.com

http://www.cu-bk.com/ (Credit Union Bank CI [Cote d’Ivoire] ) –> transferred tohttp://www.creditunionbankci.com/

http://www.sprintsecuritiesbv.com

http://www.lyonaise.com

http://www.firstpacific-fc.com/

http://www.primroseventures.8m.net/Universal Securities BV (Netherlands)CRUBANK CORPORATION OF BAHAMASMonarch International BankDBS Bank (fake?)

www.guaranteefinanceltd.com

www.drc-ng.com/ (impersonating the Central Bank of Nigeria)KapitalSecuritiesCrownSecuritiesBV.come-litebv.com

http://www.equitafinance.bizhttp://www.alliedcharteredbanks.com/

http://www.swisscarribean.comhttp://www.allstatestrustbank.com/ (apparently impersonating a real bank)

USA

Heres one I haven’t seen before. They even set me up with a nice online bank account just full of money. I AM DR. OSCAR DURU… I RETIRED LAST MONTH AS THE CHIEF AUDITOR IN THE CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA; AND IN THE COURSE OF MY ROUTINE WORK, I CAME ACROSS AN INTERNATIONAL FUND TRANSFER FILE WITH YOUR NAME AS BENEFICIARY. [blah blah] THE NEXT STEP WAS TO CONTACT YOU TO RECONFIRM YOUR BANKING COORDINATES, BUT THERE WERE RAMPANT FRAUDS AND SCAMS INVOLVING ALMOST ALL AREAS OF THE CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA, AND I THEREFORE DECIDED TO MOVE CAUTIOUSLY. IT BECAME IMPOSSIBLE TO TRANSFER OUT THIS MONEY FROM THE CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA! LAST MONTH, I FOUND THE SOLUTION! USING MY WELL FOUNDED CONNECTIONS IN THE CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA, I RAISED A PAYMENT VOUCHER IN YOUR FAVOUR, AND PAID IN THE SUM OF USD75 million INTO THE MONARCH INTERNATIONAL BANK PLC. … THIS MONEY IS NOW DEPOSITED IN YOUR PERSONAL ACCOUNT IN MONARCH INTERNATIONAL BANK PLC; AND I WILL INSTRUCT YOU LATER HOW TO PERSONALLY WIRE TRANSFER PART OR ALL OF IT TO ANY BANK OF YOUR CHOICE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD! http://www.monarchinternationalbankonline.com PLEASE CONTACT ME IMMEDIATELY BY EMAIL, STATING YOUR CURRENT PHONE, AND FAX NUMBERS, AND I WILL GET BACK TO YOU WITH THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: (1) Customer Name (2) Customer ID (3) Security Code (4) Account Number (5) Amount in US$ ONCE YOU GET THE ABOVE INFORMATION FROM ME, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO GO STRAIGHT TO THE MENU PAGE OF THE MONARCH INTERNATIONAL BANK PLC,AND TO CUSTOMER LOG IN, AND IMMEDIATELY ACCESS YOUR ACCOUNT/MONEY! THE LOGICAL AND NEXT STAGE IS FOR YOU TO BEGIN WIRING OUT YOUR MONEY! UNBELIEVABLE? PLEASE TRY AND SEE! REGARDS, OSCAR DURU Phone: +234 90 505 509 email: antonio3@congomail.com – and later – Dear Friend, I have tried several times to reach you by phone but unfortunately I did not succeed. I have good news; I have concluded the establishment of your A/C, and I am now ready to give you the A/C access information. As per our agreement, upon receipt of your Access information, you will arrange to wire immediately 25% of the total holdings in your A/C to my personal Bank A/C below. Bank: DBS BANK ADDRESS: 6 SHENTON WAY DBS BUILDING, SINGAPORE 068809 A/C No: 0065-000361-01-4 SWIFT: DBSSSGSG BENEFICIARY: OSCAR DURU PLEASE CALL ME IMMEDIATELY ON ++234 90 505 509 TO RECEIVE THE ACCESS INFORMATION WHICH WILL INCLUDE: AMOUNT: CUSTOMER NAME: CUSTOMER ID: SECURITY CODE: A/C NUMBER: Regards, Oscar Duru From: OSCAR DURU [oscarduru@fastmail.fm] Sent: Thursday, August 01, 2002 11:38 PM To: Kindly Contributor Subject: YOUR A/C ACCESS INFORMATION (please also open attachment) amount: USD75000000 customername: Kindly Contributor customerid: Kindly securitycode: Z55X66T110 accountnumber: 903-111-672

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.
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IS YOUR ANTI VIRUS PROTECTING YOUR COMPUTER, LET’s FIND OUT. FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS.

Obviously no one wants to infect their computer just to make sure their anti-virus scanner is properly working. Following the below steps will create an EICAR test virus that will help identify if the anti-virus program you have installed is properly working and that it will prompt you for deletion when detected.

Note: This test virus is non-viral and will not damage your computer in any way. It is only meant as a method of testing your virus scanner.

How to create the a test virus

1. Create a new text file using Notepad or any text editor.

2. Open the text file and enter the below code as the text of the file.

X5O!P%@AP[4\PZX54(P^)7CC)7}$EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$H+H*

3. After the above code has been entered save the file as an .exe file instead of a .txt file. For example, name the file test.exe instead of test.txt. Alternatively you can save the file as a .txt file and then rename the file after it has been saved.

Note: In order for this to work you must have Windows showing the file extensions. By default Windows may be trying to save the file as a .txt file even if you end your file with .exe. For example, the file may be saving as test.exe.txt instead of test.exe. If after saving or renaming the file the icon still looks like a notepad, it is not being saved as an executable file.

How to always show computers file extensions.

4. After the file has been saved the anti-virus should immediately prompt for action, similar to what is shown below. If you do not receive a prompt try highlighting the file, and then right-click and choose the option to scan the file with your scanner.

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.
NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.
For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com
If you need any help or have questions comment
Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com
SANJEEV SHUKLA
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If after following all of the above steps you do not receive any type of warning, your virus scanner is either not enabled or not working properly. We highly recommend either re-installing the installed antivirus scanner or trying an alternative virus scanner.

The malware wars: How you can fight it? Email and Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

A tip-filled conversation with Andrew Brandt, director of threat research at Solera Networks, reveals some of the ways hackers sneak malware into PCs.

Malware most often embeds itself with our unwitting help, but even when we have our defenses fully up, malware can still climb aboard. Nevertheless, there are practical and effective ways to defeat it — or clean it out after the fact.

Malware detection and decryption is my business

I met with Brandt at the annual February RSA security conference in San Francisco, Calif. We sat down to talk about the current state of malware and online security.

“Bring it on!” is Brandt’s mantra on malware. That’s because his job is letting malware run on his systems — on purpose. Using Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 test machines, he regularly browses sites known to harbor malicious content. But his unprotected systems (sometimes referred to as honey pots) often get malware infections all on their own.

The viruses, Trojans, etc. deposited daily on his computers are fodder for his primary work: reverse-engineering malware so he can understand how the latest exploits work — and how to prevent malware from intruding again. “Unfortunately,” says Brandt, “the goal posts are constantly changing with each malware sample. By design, more-sophisticated malware scripts change every time they run; they effectively create a custom version and, in doing so, change their identity every time they run. That constant change defeats much of the security software in use, which is looking for some previous design [or signature].”

Does that mean installing and using AV software is futile? “No,” says Brandt, “any amount of protection certainly helps. Some security software is better than others at finding and quarantining infections, but no single product can detect everything that’s out there, especially when it changes by the minute — not by the day, by the minute!

As Brandt explains, AV programs need to cross-check each instance of a malware attack against a constantly updated database. But a database containing every version of malware is infeasible; it gets too large to be of practical use. Hacking codes often change their signature by as little as one byte — which might be enough to defeat signature-matching. Moreover, well-written (for want of a better term) malware uses obfuscation techniques to hide itself within a PC. “So an infection can be found only after the damage is done.” Brandt notes, “Of course, then it’s too late.”

To prevent infections, says Brandt, “You’ve got to embrace [anti-malware] deficiencies and take more personal responsibility. Most people tend to click before they think, and sites like Facebook have made matters worse. We click a link simply because it came from a social-network friend. At this point in the malware wars, you need to put a critical eye on any link — no matter how trusted the source. Your Facebook or email friend might have been fooled, and the link they sent you goes to a site that automatically loads its exploit.”

Social-engineering threats are rapidly growing, courtesy of the security vulnerabilities of sites that regularly use abbreviated URLs. Anyone who’s read Twitter or Facebook posts is familiar with cryptic URLs such as bitly, tinyurl,and snipurl. Because they’re shortened to seemingly random letters, numbers, and characters, you don’t know where they’re actually taking you. But all too often, we click them anyway.

  • Tip: You can preview shortened URLs to see their true destination. For example, with bitly addresses, simply paste them into your browser, add a + after the URL (for example, //bitly.com/13LRaF4+ [Solera Networks page]), and press Enter. Adding the plus sign takes you to the bitly site first, where you’ll see a stats page for the destination site.

    For tinyurl addresses, add “preview” before the address. For example, enter //preview.tinyurl.com/{xxxxx}, and the uncloaked address will appear at the tinyurl site.

    For snipurl addresses, add “peek” before the shortened address. For example, //peek.snipurl.com/26kl5qytakes you to the Snipurl site and displays the full

For any link — short or long — in a webpage, hover your cursor over the link and the true, full address should appear at the bottom of the browser window. Say, for example, you get an email from PayPal with what looks superficially like a legitimate link. But if the true link is something like //X5932OwzBulgaria45634.cn or //paypal.gotcha.co.ru, it could well lead to getting hacked or phished.

Figure 1. Fake PayPal notification

The ingredients of a malicious hack recipe

From his years of observing malware, Brandt believes that “the number one delivery method of a hack is a ZIP file. It might be disguised as a link or email attachment, but when opened, it will automatically unzip and execute the exploit that lodges malicious code in your computer.” Zipping the malware also hides its signature executable file, thus preventing its detection by AV software.

Other popular methods for delivering malware include PDFs, EXE files, and links that take you to intermediate sites that then immediately forward you to compromised sites. So again, it’s important to preview the address of a link. Some poorly written ones will actually show an executable file at the end — //dangerousmalware.com/569dk.exe, for example.

According to Brandt, if you know where a malware file resides on your computer, you might be able to manually remove it. But then you have to know exactly what you’re looking for. “From my research, I’ve noticed that these files are usually deposited in temp-file locations. They show up as .exe or .dll files.” You don’t normally find executable files in a temp-file folder.

“If you are still using XP, I’d advise upgrading to Win7 or Win8 as soon as possible — XP is wide open to malware intrusions. Vista and Windows 7 [mostly] fixed this open door with the User Account Control; it pops up every time there is an attempt to make changes to your system, legitimate or not (such as when a new app tries to install). Most people just click Okay and continue, but this is one point when there’s a chance of stopping an infection from entering.”

Caught red-handed: A conversation with a hacker

The malware-monitoring systems in Brandt’s lab see constant activity from online. “One time, I was tending to one PC and, when I turned away from it momentarily, I noticed an open chat window on another machine. A message in the chat screen stated, ‘Yo, bro, you caught me.’ I responded back with an ‘LOL.’” Using malware installed on the XP system, a hacker was creating a text-based report of every open window’s titlebar and sending it to an address in Tunisia.

“I created a text file on my desktop that said, ‘Hey, come back.’ He did. In a series of chat sessions, he told me his story: He ran a network business in Tunisia but, because of the revolution there, business was slow. So to earn money to take care of his family, he was creating botnets to take over computers around the world. He used the botnets to harvest passwords, credit card numbers, and other personal data that he could then sell to other hackers.” (A lot of malware guys get cocky and start communicating with security analysts directly, in a sort of catch-me-if-you-can game.)

“There are open, online markets where malware exploit codes are available free or for sale. The Tunisian hacker would get them as soon as they were made available and use them. He also used free (and perfectly legitimate) remote-control software — TeamViewer (site ) — to take over computers. It would send back screen shots from infected PCs to him every 30 seconds.”

Today, says Brandt, most of the malicious code comes from Russia and other East European countries and from China. Much of it is implemented lazily, so it conforms to known patterns which many email clients recognize and immediately send to spam folders. But some of it does get through. Unfortunately, many of these guys are one step ahead of the analysts.”

Brandt’s Tunisian chat-pal hacker was apparently close to getting caught but shut down his operation in the nick of time. After that he was more particular about his exploits.

When asked the top three ways to deter malware on a PC, Brandt’s suggestions are ones we should all know — and follow — by now.

  • Stop using Windows XP.
  • Install and keep updated security software such as the free AVG (site) and Malwarebytes (site).
  • Most important: Think before clicking any link and whenever Windows unexpectedly asks whether you want to proceed with a change to your PC settings.
Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.
NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.
For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com
If you need any help or have questions comment
SANJEEV SHUKLA
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WINDOWS 8 Vs WINDOWS RT: WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU BUY? Email-Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

During recent travels around the western U.S., I asked many computer salespeople about Windows 8 — and was truly SHOCKED at inaccurate information provided about the new OS.

Few knew the key differences between versions, and almost all offered “advice” that was way off the mark.

Windows 8 and Windows RT. Do you know the difference? Try tackling these seemingly simple, real-world questions. I’ll provide the correct answers (they might surprise you) to these questions and others further below. They should help you make the right Windows choice — especially if you’re interested in a new Windows-based tablet.

  • Is it true I have to buy all apps for my new Surface tablet from Microsoft’s Windows Store?
  • Will all Windows Store apps work on the new Microsoft Surface tablets?
  • I use LastPass to manage all my passwords. Will LastPass work with Lenovo’s IdeaPad tablets and notebooks?
  • Are there significant differences between Office 2013 and Office 2013 RT?
  • My new Windows tablet came with Word 2013 preinstalled. Can I print documents from Word on my HP LaserJet?
  • Can I sync SkyDrive files with my new Surface tablet?
  • Can I run Outlook on the new Microsoft Surface tablets? How about Windows Live Mail or Windows Photo Gallery?

Significant differences separate RT and Win8

Back in August, I wrote a Top Story that delved into the ways Windows 8 differed from Windows RT. Here’s how I summarized those differences:

“Windows RT is the version of Windows 8 that doesn’t run Windows programs.”

That’s really the heart of the matter — and it’s the source of ongoing confusion for consumers, sales clerks, and others who really should know what you can — and can’t — do with the two OSes.

In a July column, “Win8 + Windows RT + WinRT = mass confusion,” I chided Microsoft for its extraordinarily poor choice of terminology. I urged the Redmondians to get the confusion sorted out so consumers can make an easily understood, informed decision about Win8 and Windows RT — on both traditional PCs and tablets. But as best I can tell, Microsoft has done virtually nothing to make the distinctions clear.

Soon, you’ll be able to buy two fundamentally different kinds of computers that share the Windows name. And unlike the iPad, hardware won’t define the version of OS installed. Desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and slates will all run Windows 8. It’s unlikely you’ll ever see Windows RT on a desktop, but it will be found on various ultralight laptops, tablets, and other mobile devices.

Unfortunately, with the two OSes sharing a similar name and appearance, many Windows 8 buyers might make a costly mistake — they’ll have purchased a Windows RT–based device that’s not up to their needs. Windows RT does look and run like Windows 8, but it does not run traditional Windows apps.

Although Microsoft has been extraordinarily coy about the details, it now appears that Windows RT computers will run look-alikes of standard, built-in Windows apps (such as Paint, WordPad, and Notepad). According to an Office Nextblog, there will be RT versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote — all with complete document compatibility. The first Windows RT devices shipped to customers in October will include preview versions of those apps that will be updated automatically to full versions over the next three months.

Windows RT should spur a new generation of touch-centric software, but it also presents a high barrier for apps you’ve come to know. Coding for the Windows RT platform is completely different from coding for traditional Windows. Some third-party software companies might try to rewrite their existing Windows programs to work in the tiled Windows RT/Metro world — and will fail. Many developers won’t bother; moving apps built for a mouse-and-keyboard environment to touch-and-swipe isn’t worth the effort.

Because it runs on its own hardware platform (CPU and support chips), Windows RT doesn’t support the vast catalog of existing Windows drivers. For example, none of the existing Win7 drivers will work on Windows RT. So hardware manufacturers are now saddled with creating, shipping, and supporting an entire new generation of hardware drivers for the new platform — and they’re all “Version 1.0.”

Bottom line: If you have a modern piece of hardware from a well-known manufacturer, it might be supported in Windows RT — or maybe not.

Some answers to basic Win8/RT questions

Here are the answers — as best I know — to those questions above and a few more. They’re certainly more accurate than what you’ll likely get at the local computer retail store.

Q1: Is it true I have to buy all apps for my new Surface tablet from Microsoft’s Windows Store?

A: Yes. All Windows RT apps will have to be purchased through the Windows Store. But don’t feel too bad — Apple does the same thing with iPad and iPhone apps. Keep in mind that only RT apps will run on Windows RT devices. (The first MS Surface tablets will run only Windows RT. Surface tablets that run Windows 8 — and thus standard Win8 apps available everywhere — should appear in January.)

Q2: Will all Windows Store apps work on the new Microsoft Surface tablets?

A: No. This is another one of those bizarre gotchas that really make the Windows RT situation complicated. Some of the apps in the Windows Store will work only with Windows 8 machines — they won’t work at all on Windows RT. Other Windows Store apps are designed to work with Windows 8 Phones, though it isn’t certain whether a Windows Phone app will work on a Windows RT machine. Check before you buy.

Q3: I use LastPass to manage all my passwords. Will LastPass work with Lenovo’s IdeaPad tablets and notebooks?

A: Depends. If you get a Windows 8 IdeaPad, you can install LastPass on the Win8 Desktop and it will work with Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, or Firefox. However, if you buy a Windows RT–based IdeaPad, you’re up the ol’ creek without a paddle. Windows RT includes the Metro version of Internet Explorer, but that browser, by design, doesn’t support add-ons. (Now, try explaining that to your less-geeky family members.)

Q4: Are there significant differences between Office 2013 and Office 2013 RT?

A: Unknown. Microsoft has publicly shown only preview and beta copies of both. The final versions aren’t expected until next year.

Q5: Reportedly, new Windows tablets will come with Word 2013 preinstalled. Can I print documents from Word on my HP LaserJet?

A: Possibly. If you bought a Windows RT tablet (some tablets will run Windows 8), Word 2013 RT is included. But printing support depends on the model of HP LaserJet you’re using — some will work immediately with Windows RT, others won’t. HP has a lengthy list of supported and unsupported printers on its website. (Be sure to read the footnotes at the bottom of the page.)

Anticipate similar problems with any peripheral you might want to use with a Windows RT machine. Although Windows 8 driver support is nearly universal (every Win7 driver and almost all Vista drivers will work with Win8), Windows RT–driver support will be hit-and-miss.

Q6: Can I sync SkyDrive files with my new Surface tablet?

A: No. You can retrieve files from SkyDrive using the Metro SkyDrive app, but you can’t have the app automatically grab updated SkyDrive files and copy them onto your RT device (the way people commonly use SkyDrive on the Windows desktop). There are probably solid reasons why automatic sync isn’t supported — its impact on battery life could be one. That said, some future version of the Metro SkyDrive app might give you the ability to sync manually. (Battery considerations probably preclude any sort of automatic synching.)

Q7: Any problem with buying a handful of Windows RT tablets and using them in my small business?

A: That’s complicated. Currently, the only version of Office announced for Windows RT is Office Home & Student 2013 RT, which does not include Outlook. The other announced versions of Office 2013 won’t run on Windows RT. The license for the standard Windows version of Office Home & Student doesn’t allow for its use in a company, nonprofit, or organizational setting of any kind. So it’s highly likely that the license for the RT version of Office won’t cover use in your business, either.

You can, on the other hand, purchase a tablet that runs Windows 8 (such as the MS Surface Pro, due out early next year) and run any standard Office version.

Q8: Can I run Outlook on the new Microsoft Surface tablets? How about Windows Live Mail or Windows Photo Gallery?

A: No, no, and no. Any Surface tablet that ships before January will be running Windows RT. As already noted, Outlook isn’t among the Office Home & Student 2013 RT apps. Moreover, all Windows Essentials/Live Essentials programs are standard Windows apps; they won’t run on Windows RT, either (as should be clear by now).

The one exception: You can use Internet Explorer 10, running in Windows RT, to access the Outlook Web App, assuming you’re set up with Exchange Server and have OWA available. Try explaining that to your boss.

Q9: I own an iPad and sync it with my PC. Will I be able to sync my iPad with one of the new Windows Surface PCs from Microsoft?

A: No. At least not with the Windows RT versions of Surface. Because Windows RT doesn’t run traditional Windows programs, you can’t crank up iTunes and sync a Windows RT tablet with your iPad or PC. Apple might, however, eventually write a Metro-style version of iTunes (when pigs fly). Surface Pro, because it uses Windows 8, will run iTunes.

Q10: What do I do if I bought the wrong kind of Windows tablet?

A: Depends. I expect to hear this question about a hundred thousand times in the next few months. I assume some of the retailers and manufacturers will be lenient and allow you to return your purchase — if you can explain why you got confused in the first place. But it’s going to be painful to watch buyers explaining to store clerks that “Yes, there is a difference between Windows RT and Windows 8.”

Perhaps taking a copy of this article with you when you ask for a refund might help!

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

Abused, Bullied & Harassed On Facebook: 6 Ways To Get Back Your Dignity. Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com and Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com

Facebook isn’t a safe haven. A recent study by GMI revealed that one in ten Facebook users have experienced some form of abuse. Among 18 – 24 year olds, one in four were affected. Offenders use their victims’ walls or private messages to post insults, threats, or other abusive messages.

In the real world it can be tough to avoid bullies or even prove what they have done. In Facebook, however, you have effective tools to deal with people who deliberately abuse you. And the good news is that all of your options are straight forward and simple.
Calmly Address The Offender

If you belong to the majority of victims that know their offender in real life (62%), you should probably respond to them. This obviously depends on the individual case, but sending a clear and mature message can do wonders or at least gain you a lot of respect.

When you speak with the offender, try to be friendly or professional. Fighting back with insults and threats will only bring you down to their low level. Instead, be mature and calmly ask the bully to stop. Only 14% of study participants had the guts to do that. Are you courageous enough to be one of them?

Report The Offense To Facebook

You can report offending wall posts to Facebook via the little ribbon menu in the top right of the respective post. Click the arrow head and select Report Story or Spam from the menu.

Next you will see a confirmation that the story was marked as spam. Click the file a report link and go through the following query to get Facebook’s attention.

If you received chat or private messages, you can essentially do the same. Go to the respective message and select Report Spam or Abuse… from the Actions menu.

In the following window, you can make one of three selections: mark the conversation as spam, report messages from a hacked friend, or report the sender as harassing or threatening you.

Unfriend The Offender

There is no good reason to remain friends with someone who is being mean to you.

Once you have marked a wall post from a friend as spam, Facebook will show you an unfriend button. Click it to remove that person from your friends list.

In private messages and anywhere else you can hover over the offender’s name and wait until a preview of their profile pops up. Hover over Friends until a menu opens, then selectUnfriend from the bottom of the list.

Block The Offender

Unfriending might not be enough, especially if you don’t want to completely lock up your profile. Fortunately, you can selectively block individual Facebook users.

Go to Privacy Settings and switch to Blocking in the left-hand-menu. Under Block users, enter the name or email address of the offender and click Block.

Adjust Your Facebook Privacy Settings

Now that you have dealt with the bully, it’s time to look at your Facebook settings. If you fall into the group of people whose culprit wasn’t even on their Facebook friends list (27% in the GMI study), you should check the doors. Are they wide open for more people to find and harrass you on Facebook?

Here is what you can do:

  • allow only friends to find your profile
  • let only friends see your personal information on Facebook
  • organize your friends in lists and share updates selectively
  • accept Facebook messages from friends only
  • lock your wall or let only friends post on it

I have summarized all of the above and more in this article on Critical Facebook Privacy Tips. Facebook has since released a new Privacy Menu and you can find a complete guide to the new Facebook privacy settings here.

Leave Facebook – Close Your Account – Open a New Account

This is a last resort. However, if you seriously want to close your Facebook account due to negative experiences, find detailed instructions on how to permanently delete your Facebook account here. However, don’t let a mean person sever your ties to family and friends on Facebook. You can always open a new account and start fresh.

Conclusion

In the virtual world of social media people may feel it is easy and anonymous to send insulting or abusive messages to other users. Our research shows that most people on Facebook are currently able to tackle the problem themselves using the technology provided. The strength of social media has always been the opportunity to easily connect and interact with friends and groups, but to ensure its continued flexibility is not restricted by legislation, it is important that the ability to limit exposure to insulting and abusive messages is simple for users to control themselves.

Have you been bullied on Facebook and how did you or would you react?

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.
NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.
For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com
If you need any help or have questions comment
Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com
SANJEEV SHUKLA
Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

TROJAN HORSE ATTACK on Mac and Windows Laptop and Desktop. Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

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It’s crucial that you read this page and fix yourself immediately. Failure to do so could result in being disconnected from the IRC network, letting strangers access your private files, or worst yet, allowing your computer to be hijacked and used in criminal attacks on others.

I. What is a Trojan horse?

Trojan horse attacks pose one of the most serious threats to computer security. If you were referred here, you may have not only been attacked but may also be attacking others unknowingly. This page will teach you how to avoid falling prey to them, and how to repair the damage if you already did. According to legend, the Greeks won the Trojan war by hiding in a huge, hollow wooden horse to sneak into the fortified city of Troy. In today’s computer world, a Trojan horse is defined as a “malicious, security-breaking program that is disguised as something benign”. For example, you download what appears to be a movie or music file, but when you click on it, you unleash a dangerous program that erases your disk, sends your credit card numbers and passwords to a stranger, or lets that stranger hijack your computer to commit illegal denial of service attacks.

The following general information applies to all operating systems, but by far most of the damage is done to/with Windows users due to its vast popularity and many weaknesses. Linux, MacOS X, and other operating systems are not as frequently infected, but they are far from immune.

(Note: Many people use terms like Trojan horse, virus, worm, hacking and cracking all interchangeably, but they really don’t mean the same thing. If you’re curious, here’s a quick primerdefining and distinguishing them. Let’s just say that once you are “infected”, trojans are just as dangerous as viruses and can spread to hurt others just as easily!)

II. How did I get infected?

Trojans are executable programs, which means that when you open the file, it will perform some action(s). A trojan horse is so named because it has to fool you in some way to get executed in the first place. There are many ways this can happen, but here are the more common ones:

Lookalikes

In Windows, executable programs have file extensions like “exe”, “vbs”, “com”, “bat”, etc. Some actual trojan filenames include: “dmsetup.exe” and “LOVE-LETTER-FOR-YOU.TXT.vbs” (when there are multiple extensions, only the last one counts, be sure to unhide your extensions so that you see it). More information on risky file extensions may be found at this [Microsoft document](http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q262/6/31.asp?LN =EN-US&SD=gn&FR=0).

Documents can be programs too!

Programs have historically been designed for convenience over security, and while this tide is changing, we’re still dealing with the aftermath.

Many document types have some sort of macro support – the ability to place a program inside the document which will be run when the document is opened, and it’s supprising just how many programs have these sort of capability. All of the Microsoft OFfice programs, Adobe Acrobat Reader, and many others all can run a program from within a document.

…even if the format isn’t meant to be executable.

There have been an increase in the number of attacks that target weaknesses the way particular programs handle a file – so, even innocious file types like mp3 files, image files, and video files have been used to spread infections – even without a macro language or other built-in way to harbor program code in the file.

Trojans can be spread in the guise of literally ANYTHING people find desirable, such as a free game, movie, song, etc. Victims typically downloaded the trojan from a WWW or FTP archive, got it via peer-to-peer file exchange using IRC/instant messaging/Kazaa etc., or just carelessly opened some email attachment. Trojans usually do their damage silently. The first sign of trouble is often when others tell you that you are attacking them or trying to infect them!

III. How do I avoid getting infected in the future?

You must be certain of BOTH the source AND content of each file you download! In other words, you need to be sure that you trust not only the person or file server that gave you the file, but also the contents of the file itself.

  • Know the source.
  • Ask questions. Even when you trust the source, it’s easy for a trojan to impersonate a user when it has control of their computer. Ask questions to determine what the file is before you download.
  • Expect the file. If you weren’t expecting a file transfer or attachment, then don’t download it until you check with the sender personally.
  • Does everything make sense? If it looks suspicious, it probably is. File types, filenames, and descriptions should all agree. Your dear aunt Sally wouldn’t put family photos in an Excel spreadsheet, right?🙂
  • Even when everything else is in order, check the contents with virus scanners.

Remember: Better to ask and feel silly, than to download blindly and be sorry.

Here are some practical tips to avoid getting infected (again). For more general security information, please see our main security help page.

  1. NEVER download blindly from people or sites which you aren’t 100% sure about. In other words, as the old saying goes, don’t accept candy from strangers. If you do a lot offile downloading, it’s often just a matter of time before you fall victim to a trojan.
  2. Even if the file comes from a friend, you still must be sure what the file is before opening it, because many trojans will automatically try to spread themselves to friends in an email address book or on an IRC channel. There is seldom reason for a friend to send you a file that you didn’t ask for. When in doubt, ask them first, and scan the attachment with a fully updated anti-virus program.
  3. Beware of hidden file extensions! Windows by default hides the last extension of a file, so that innocuous-looking “susie.jpg” might really be “susie.jpg.exe” – an executable trojan! To reduce the chances of being tricked, unhide those pesky extensions.
  4. NEVER use features in your programs that automatically get or preview files. Those features may seem convenient, but they let anybody send you anything which is extremely reckless. For example, never turn on “auto DCC get” in mIRC, instead ALWAYS screen every single file you get manually. Likewise, disable the preview mode in Outlook and other email programs.
  5. Never blindly type commands that others tell you to type, or go to web addresses mentioned by strangers, or run pre-fabricated programs or scripts (not even popular ones). If you do so, you are potentially trusting a stranger with control over your computer, which can lead to trojan infection or other serious harm.
  6. Don’t be lulled into a false sense of security just because you run anti-virus programs. Those do not protect perfectly against many viruses and trojans, even when fully up to date. Anti-virus programs should not be your front line of security, but instead they serve as a backup in case something sneaks onto your computer.
  7. Finally, don’t download an executable program just to “check it out” – if it’s a trojan, the first time you run it, you’re already infected!

IV. How do I get rid of trojans?!?

Here are your many options, none of them are perfect. I strongly suggest you read through all of them before rushing out and trying to run some program blindly. Remember – that’s how you got in this trouble in the first place. Good luck!

To repair or to reformat?

The decision whether to attempt to repair an infected computer or reformat and do a clean reinstallation is a difficult one. On one hand, no antimalware software will ever be able to provide 100% assurance that all malware has been removed. On the other hand, most infections are from the same couple of hundred actively circulating trojans, that are well understood and reliably removed by the appropriate removal tool, and a clean reformat and reinstall with take anywhere from several hours to several days.

As a practical matter, it’s worth trying to repair infected computers first. Most of the time, you can completely get rid of the infection quickly and easily. If an infection persistantly returns, it’s likely that it wasn’t completely removed in the first place, at which point stronger measures should be considered.

Getting Help

There are several resources for one-on-one assistance with malware issues, including trojan horses. If you aren’t sure what to do, you can try one of the following:

  • IRC Help Channels: If you’re the type that needs some hand-holding, you can find trojan/virus removal help on IRC itself, such as EFnet #dmsetup. These experts will try to figure out which trojan(s) you have and offer you advice on how to fix it. The previous directions were in fact adapted from advice given by EFnet #dmsetup. (See our networks page if you need help connecting to those networks.)
  • Your antimalware vendor: If you are paying for security software, you may be entitled to support from the vendor.
  • Your PC manufacturer: If you are under a support agreement, or some warranties, your PC manufacturer may provide malware removal assistance.
  • Professional Repair Services: A professional PC repair service can be contracted locally for assistance with removing viruses or trojans.

Repairing the Damage

  1. Anti-Virus SoftwareSome of these can handle most of the well known trojans, but none are perfect, no matter what their advertising claims. You absolutely MUST make sure you have the very latest update files for your programs, or else they will miss the latest trojans. Compared to traditional viruses, today’s trojans evolve much quicker and come in many seemingly innocuous forms, so anti-virus software is always going to be playing catch up. Also, if they fail to find every trojan, anti-virus software can give you a false sense of security, such that you go about your business not realizing that you are still dangerously compromised. There are many products to choose from, but the following are generally effective: AVPPC-cillin, and McAfee VirusScan. All are available for immediate downloading typically with a 30 day free trial. For a more complete review of all major anti-virus programs, including specific configuration suggestions for each, see the HackFix Project’s anti-virus software page [all are ext. links]. When you are done, make sure you’ve updated Windows with all security patches [ext. link].
  2. Anti-Trojan Programs: These programs are the most effective against trojan horse attacks, because they specialize in trojans instead of general viruses. A popular choice is The Cleaner, $30 commercial software with a 30 day free trial. To use it effectively When you are done, make sure you’ve updated Windows with all security patches [ext. link], then change all your passwords because they may have been seen by every “hacker” in the world.

Using The Cleaner effectively

The Cleaner is specifically designed for trojans, and should be used as a supplement rather than a replacement for other antimalware software.

Follow these instructions carefully, if you skip a step, your system may still be infected.

  1. Download the program The Cleaner 2012 from http://www.moosoft.com/ orftp.moosoft.com in /pub and remember where you save it to.
  2. Run cleaner8_setup.exe to install the program.
  3. Run The Cleaner by clicking on the desktop icon created.
  4. Press the Update tab then the Check for Updates button.
  5. Close The Cleaner and reboot your computer into Safe Mode — If you do not know how to boot into Safe Mode, instructions are athttp://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222
  6. Unplug your modem during the scan and leave it unplugged until instructed otherwise.
  7. When your computer reboots, start The Cleaner AS STEP 3, select Scan, then select Full Scan and Use Heuristics and then select Start then select all your drives and then select Ok.
  8. When you are finished with the above, reboot again, plug your modem back in, and update your Windows at http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com
  9. Change ALL your passwords, and review your accounts for suspicious access. Trojan horses will usually capture sensitive information, including any passwords that were saved on or typed into the computer during the time it was infected.
  10. Finally, review outstanding authorizations on sites you use – changing your password alone isn’t enough to lock someone out of GMail, Twitter, Hotmail, Facebook, and many other services that issue authorization tokens to third party applications. See below for specific advice for common services.

Instructions for securing access to online services

Clean Re-installation

When all else fails, or when any risk of continued infection is unacceptable, the only option left is a clean re-installation. Although arduous, this will always be the only sure way to eradicate a trojan or virus.

A clean re-installation will take anywhere from several hours to several days to fully complete, depending on your system configuration, operating system, amount of data to be recovered, and many other factors. This will require some degree of technical competency, and you will need to have your original operating system or recovery media, as well as original media for any application software, as well as any license keys ready before you begin.

Extreme caution must be taken in backing up and restoring data to make sure that the infection is not reintroduced when data is restored.

A professional PC repair shop can be contracted locally to perform a clean reinstallation, should you not feel capable of doing so yourself.

  1. Back up your entire hard disk.
  2. Reformat the disk.
  3. Re-install the operating system and all your applications from original CDs
  4. Install security software and configure it according to manufacturer’s recommendations.
  5. Install all operating system updates. (Setting updates to automatically install here is a good idea too.)
  6. Install all updates to your application software.
  7. Make sure system is clean up to this point by scanning the system.
  8. At this point, you may wish to make an image of your system in a pristine state, before restoring anything from backup. You can use this image at a later time to speed up a clean reinstallation by only needing to download updates.
  9. Treat the contents of the backup as infected, and handle accordingly during the restore process. Scan everything you decide to restore, and restore only your user files, and not configuration files for programs, registry settings, or applications.

This will take several hours, and require some degree of technical competency  If you are not up to the task a professional repair shop can be paid to perform these steps or you can

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

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Free Military-Grade Privacy For Your Files: How Bitlocker Works Windows. Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

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Ever heard that quote about trying to explain how a television works to an ant? I’m not calling you an ant, even though you are hard-working and enjoy the occasional sip of aphid milk. What I am saying is that I’m going to explain how Windows BitLocker works, without you having to have a degree in computer science and cryptography experience.

BitLocker is a feature of Windows 7 and 8 that is extremely useful, included in the operating system, and not nearly as many people know about it as they should. If you’re curious about what other cool stuff your Windows operating system might have, check out Christian Cawley’s, “The Top 5 Cool Hidden Features In Windows 8” and Yaara Lancet’s article, “8 Hidden Tools In Windows 7 You Still Might Not Know About“. Here, though, I’ll be focusing on Windows’ military-grade privacy tool called BitLocker.

What Is BitLocker?

Not all Windows’ operating systems have BitLocker bundled with them. At this point, it is just in the Ultimate and Enterprise editions of Vista, and Windows 7, and with Pro and Enterprise editions of Windows 8. You can also find it in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2012. What BitLocker is, it’s a drive encryption tool. A drive encryption tool is something that takes all your data on any particular drive and make it completely unreadable to anyone but you. If you don’t have one of these operating systems, I suggest you take a look at TrueCrypt and our TrueCrypt User’s Guide: Secure Your Private Files.

There are two meanings for ‘drive’ in this case. One is any volume or partition on a single hard drive. You need at least two volumes on the drive to use BitLocker – a main volume that you probably will do your day to day work in, and another volume that is at least 100MB in size that will be your system’s volume. Your computer will boot from this volume. This volume can NOT be encrypted. That would make booting your computer very difficult.

The other ‘drive’ is any removable drive like your USB drive. This type of drive does NOT require a boot volume. Which is really cool, because if you encrypt your USB flash drive and you have sensitive information on it, you don’t really have to worry about anyone getting that information if you lose the drive.

How Does It Encrypt My Drive?

BitLocker takes all the data on your drive and applies a bunch of fancy math to that data. Remember, all data can be boiled down to just numbers so it can be manipulated with math. Officially, this math comes in the form of algorithms, or sets of instructions, such as AES – 128-bit or 256-bit encryption, and Diffuser.

Let’s go through a very simplified process of encrypting the word ‘USE’.

Diffuser takes those three letters and scrambles them. It could come out as ESU, SUE, SEU and so on. Then BitLocker creates the key, which is the way to unscramble that word, and holds on to it for you.

Now BitLocker applies AES. AES is the Advanced Encryption Standard adopted by the US Government as a standard in 2001 – hence the military-grade designation in the title. 128-bit or 256-bit encryption defines how many bits a single bit of your original data may be represented by. Now, a bit is just one piece of data, like a letter or a number. Then, the math makes that particular bit into a ‘combination’ or key that is either 128 or 256 bits long. It’s like slapping a combination lock with a 256-numbers-long combination on a locker holding the letter ‘U’. Think about that.

Let’s go back to encrypting the word ‘USE’. You have to open three different lockers with three different combination locks, each with a combination that is 256 numbers long. Now, you can see how this would be a pain to anybody but the most dedicated cracker.

This is where it gets military-grade, I mean tank tough! Remember AES? Well that application puts each combination lock through the math 14 times for 256-bit encryption! Now, you have to know 14 different 256-bit-long combinations to get at your letter ‘U’. Forget it. Go home, cracker. Of course, BitLocker creates a key that will unlock, or decrypt that word for you.

At the end of it, there are two keys now needed to start the process of decrypting your data. If someone doesn’t have access to both of those keys, they are going to have to be very patient, very smart, and very dedicated to get at your information.

These keys aren’t physical keys of course, and they don’t resemble passwords either. By themselves, they would look like gobledy-gook to ordinary folk like you and me. But what Windows does is allow BitLocker to use those two keys to get at your data, as long as you can prove to the computer that you are who you say you are. These keys are held by the Trusted Platform Module.

What is a Trusted Platform Module?

The Trusted Platform Module is another key piece in the BitLocker set of tools to protect you. This is a bit of hardware that can be found on most computers.

What it does is check out your computer each time it boots to make sure no one has been trying to mess with the start-up procedures to get around your encryption. What it also does is prevent someone from just slipping the hard drive out of your computer and popping it into their computer to get at the files.

Depending how you set up your BitLocker, your TPM may just let you log on to your computer. Or, you might set it up so that it requires a PIN number to continue to logging in. Or, you can create a USB key that has to be plugged into your computer when you boot, to get you to the login stage. Or you can go hardcore and set it up to require that you have a PIN AND a USB key. The TPM applies only to volumes that are physically on your computer. USB drives don’t need a TPM, but they may need a PIN or USB key for verification.
There are computers without TPM’s, but for most computers manufactured after 2006, the TPM module is already on the motherboard.

Is BitLocker Totally Safe?

Well, no, nothing really is. But it’s as safe as you’re going to get without having the budget of the CIA or MI-5. Speaking of government spying, the UK’s Home Office has asked Microsoft to put a backdoor in BitLocker to allow them to have easy access to your data. Microsoft has flat out refused to do so. Score one for Microsoft.

So, How Do I Use BitLocker?

It’s surprisingly easy to use if you are just going to encrypt your main volume on the hard drive in your computer. Check out this short video on how easy it is.

If you want to get into the guts of BitLocker and use it on external drives or set up the different TPM validation methods, it can get a bit more complicated. Microsoft does have a Step-By-Step Guide for BitLocker on Windows 7. I haven’t seen any real documentation on Windows 8 yet. If you have, let us know in the comments, please.

Should I Use BitLocker?

BitLocker is the best protection for your data that you are going to get just by buying a Windows computer. If you are concerned about data theft and the security of your information, why wouldn’t you make this military-grade tool a part of your computer security arsenal? It just makes sense. BitLocker is a serious tool developed for you by a company so many people think of as being evil at different times. I think this application is a redeeming quality for Microsoft and makes me feel less disgruntled about the cost of getting Windows.

What do you think? Do you currently use BitLocker? I’d like to hear about your experiences with it. Do you feel safer knowing BitLocker is out there and may be a part of your Windows computer? Let’s hear about it in the comments. No encrypting please.

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

Why USB Sticks, Flash Drive and Pen Drive Are Dangerous & How To Protect Yourself?

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USB drives are so pervasive in today’s world of technology, but when they first debuted, they revolutionized data exchange. The first USB flash drives had an 8MB capacity, which isn’t much by today’s standards, but a far cry better than the alternatives – the 1.44MB floppy or the CD that required permanent burning. Nowadays we have USB drives that are larger than traditional hard drives.  But for all the convenience and power of the USB drive, there are some serious USB drive danger to be wary of.

The ubiquity of the USB drive has made us overly trusting of the technology. We plug them in, pull them out, and plug them in again without a second thought to issues of security and protection. And I’m not just talking about “safe ejection” to prevent data corruption. I’m talking about viruses, malware, and all of those pesky nuisances that love to infect every corner of our systems.

Unfortunately for us all, we need to be diligent about USB security just as much as we are about hard drive and network security. Keep reading to learn more about this problem and how you can adequately guard yourself against it.

USB Drives Are Like Mosquitoes

When we hear about network and computer safety, we often hear tips and tricks that are somehow related to the Internet. Don’t click random email links. Don’t visit shady websites. Keep your firewalls up and your antivirus databases updated. Use safe passwords and stay vigilant against keylogger infections.

Now consider this scenario: a high-security headquarters where lots of confidential work with sensitive data is being done. Places like this are often isolated from the Internet, instead relying on a closed-circuit intranet for data sharing and communication. And when you consider a place that’s completely severed from the malice of Internet hackers, you’d think the security would be top-notch.

And in reality, the security is good. It’s near impossible to hack or corrupt an internal network like that without performing the kind of impressive stunts that you’d see in the next Mission Impossible. Yet even so, hackers were clever enough to find ways to infiltrate secure compounds from a distance: by infecting the very USB drives that employees would use to transfer files from outside to inside the building.

There are plenty of cases where viruses piggybacked onto USB devices in order to spread like wildfire across the world. Remember the dreaded Conficker worm? The United States military ended up having some trouble with the agent.btz worm that was brought in through an infected USB drive. And more recently, there was the cyber-weapon Stuxnet worm.

And so, USB drives are like mosquitoes. They have the potential to pick up infections when plugged into an infected computer and they can spread those infections almost instantaneously as they’re plugged into other devices. This is why it’s so important that you keep not only your computers clean but your USB devices as well using regular scans antivirus programs.

USB Disk Security

USB Disk Security is a tool from Zbshareware Lab that is as close to an all-in-one USB protection suite as you can get. It provides a whole host of features and safety options to keep you as protected as you can be in all things related to USB drives. Most USB security tools will focus on the USB drives themselves, but USB Disk Security goes way beyond that.

USB Disk Security has the following features:

  • USB Shield, which protects you in real-time against connected USB devices.
  • USB Scan, which scans connected USB devices for malicious software.
  • USB Access Control, which prevents your computer data from being copied to USB devices.
  • USB Drive Control, which prevents USB devices from even connecting to your computer in the first place.

USB Disk Security supports Windows XP, 2003, 2008, Vista, and 7, but it may interfere with other antivirus programs already installed on your system. It’s free with limited features. A lifetime license will cost you $55 USD which unlocks all features and includes all future updates to the software.

BitDefender USB Immunizer

As you might have surmised from the description of USB’s dangers, most viruses depend onautomatically running when the USB drive is plugged into a computer. This is in large part determined by the presence of an autorun.inf file which, as the name suggestions, automatically runs upon connection.

BitDefender, a security software company that I’ve praised in the past, has a free tool called the USB Immunizer that immunizes your chosen USB device against malicious autorun.inf files by creating its own special autorun.inf file that cannot be deleted or replaced.

BitDefender USB Immunizer works on Windows XP, Vista, and 7 on USB devices that are formatted with FAT, FAT32, and NTFS file systems.

USB Dummy Protect

The USB Dummy Protect program has an interesting theory behind the way it protects your USB devices. Long story short: viruses and malware require available memory space in order to exist on a USB drive, therefore, if you fill up a USB drive entirely and leave no space whatsoever, then viruses and malware can’t get on no matter what.So that’s what USB Dummy Protect does. It creates a dummy.file file on your USB device that takes up every last bit of free space. When you want to remove that protection, you just delete the file. Easy. If you tend to transfer files to and from your USB drive frequently, this may not be the most elegant solution, but if you have a USB drive whose contents rarely ever change then this could be fantastic for you.However, due to the way that FAT file systems are designed, this method will not work if your USB device has more than 4GB of free space (since file sizes in FAT systems have a maximum of 4GB). For NTFS drives, you shouldn’t experience any problems.

Conclusion

USB drive dangers require constant vigilance. You might use the same USB drive for years without a hitch, then one day you could grab a file off of your friend’s computer and end up infecting your home network with something serious. USB security is not often on the minds of computer users, even the tech-savvy ones, but as long as you are aware and take proactive steps against the potential spread of viruses that piggyback on USB devices, you’ll be all right.If you have any other suggestions for software aimed at USB-related security, please share them with us in the comments

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Emailoomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

Email Get FREE ANTI VIRUS FOR 15 MONTHS

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MAC OS X KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS.

No matter what operating system or program you’re using, keyboard shortcuts are a tool you can use to make things quite a bit easier for yourself. Simply not having to take your hands off the keyboard can save you lots of time wasted by reaching for the mouse. This is why learning keyboard shortcuts for the systems you use every day is so vital to productivity. Once you get familiar with the keyboard shortcuts, you’ll wonder how you ever got by without them.

If you’re a Mac user, you’re in luck. There are many useful Mac keyboard shortcuts for everyday functions. You may even know a few of them already. To ensure you get the most out of your Mac, today we’ll talk you through all the important things you should know about using keyboard shortcuts on Mac OS X.

The Primary Shortcut Keys

There are dozens of symbols used to denote keyboard shortcuts in Mac OS X. Throughout the operating system they are used universally, so there is no confusion. On the internet, often people use full or brief names as they don’t know how to type the symbols or want to ensure it’s very clear which key they mean. Here are the most common keys and symbols you will need to use for shortcuts.

  • Command (CMD) – Often shown as a four-petaled ? symbol, apple logo or in brief as CMD.
  • Option – Shown using a symbol of a left-to-right slash with horizontal lines ? or in brief as OPT.
  • Control – Seen in shortcuts as the caret ^ symbol or in brief as CTRL.
  • Fn (Function) – Usually written as Fn.
  • Shift – Often denoted by an upwards arrow ?.
  • Caps Lock – Shown in shortcut menus as an upwards arrow with a line underneath ?
  • Delete – Seen as a backwards arrow symbol ? or in brief as DEL.
  • Escape – Usually seen as a circular symbol with an arrow heating to the top-left ? or in brief as ESC.

Note also that if you are on a laptop, you may need to use the Function key to access certain keys, like the F1-F12 keys.

The Most Important Mac OS X Shortcuts

There are so many keyboard shortcuts available by default that it would be overwhelming to list them all here. Instead, learn a few of the most important shortcuts, then take a look at the cheat sheets offered below.

Startup/Shutdown Shortcuts:

  • C – Start from bootable disk.
  • CMD-S – Start in Single User Mode.
  • SHIFT – Start in Safe Mode.
  • OPTION-CMD-EJECT – Put Computer To Sleep.
  • CTRL-EJECT – Opens Restart / Sleep / Shutdown Dialogue.

Finder & Application Shortcuts:

  • CMD-A – Select All.
  • CMD-C – Copy.
  • CMD-X – Cut.
  • CMD-Z – Undo / Redo.
  • CMD-V – Paste.
  • CMD-S – Save.
  • CMD-F – Open Find Dialogue.
  • CMD-N – New Finder Window.
  • CMD-Shift-N – Create New Folder.
  • CMD-R – Show Original Of Alias.
  • CMD-W – Close Window.
  • CMD-M – Minimize Window.
  • CMD-Q – Quit Application.
  • CMD-OPTION-ESC – Open Force Quit Dialogue.

Screenshot Shortcuts:

  • CMD-SHIFT-3 – Screenshot Of Whole Screen.
  • CMD-SHIFT-4 – Screenshot Of Selected Area.

Spotlight/Application Changing Shortcuts:

  • CMD-Space – Open Spotlight Search Field.
  • CMD-Tab – Change to Next Most Recently Used Application.
  • F9 – Tile / Untile Open Windows.

Mac OS X Shortcut Cheat Sheets

We love our shortcuts at MakeUseOf so much that we create cheat sheets for everyone to download. Here’s the latest version of our Mac OS X shortcut cheat sheet for you to use. Also, here is a cheat sheet written by Apple, which could also be of use to you as it discusses many of the regular shortcuts used within programs in Mac OS X. If you’re having trouble learning your shortcuts, there’s also a program called Cheatsheet which will help you to recall them.

Keyboard Shortcuts Within Programs

In every Mac OS X program, you can find useful Mac keyboard shortcuts to use simply by looking at the menu items. Next to the menu item you want to use, often there is a keyboard shortcut listed next to it. Not all items will have a shortcut by default, but if you find yourself using the same menu item repeatedly you can easily see how you can make the job quicker for yourself.

If you use a particular program every day, search for that program’s keyboard shortcut. Sometimes there are very specific shortcuts available which make a world of difference to your everyday usage.

Creating Your Own Keyboard Shortcuts in Mac OS X

Head to your System Preferences, then Keyboards and you’ll find an option for Keyboard Shortcuts. From here, you can add your own keyboard shortcuts to control your actions throughout Mac OS X. Be creative! When you’re finished you’ll see the shortcuts listed in the menus for the relevant programs.

Shortcuts For Special Characters

To type special characters in Mac OS X, there are plenty of shortcuts available. For instance, it’s easy to type accents for foreign languages if you learn the keyboard shortcuts. This will save you from having to swap keyboard languages regularly.

Transferring Keyboard Shortcuts From Other Operating Systems

Many programs have instructions online featuring keyboard shortcuts for Windows. Often these same shortcuts can be used on Mac OS X just by changing the CTRL key for the CMD key. For instance, normally you would find CTRL-S to save in Windows versus CMD-S to save in Mac OS X. Save your work first though, just in case it doesn’t do quite what you expect!Which Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts could you not live without?

Editor’s note: As part of our cleaning series, we are focusing on one topic each day to get your computing life in order. Check back each day this week for a new topic.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

Disposing Of An Old Laptop – What To Recycle, What To Keep?

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Laptops are a treasure trove of parts that can live more than one life. Whether they continue a life as spare part or become the subject of a DIY tech project, you can get a lot of extra value out of your old hardware. And at the very least you can give a broken laptop to a recycling facility that will recover valuable materials like gold, copper, aluminum, and many more. Curious to see which parts you can easily extract yourself and re-use in one way or the other?

Laptops consist of a standard set of parts, which every manufacturer composes in a unique way. Hence it is almost impossible to give general advice on how to remove specific parts. And it’s often pointless to stock up on old parts for future use, as they won’t fit into newer laptop models. The video below demonstrates the partial dis-assembly of a HP Compaq nw8440 and gives you an idea of the valuables hidden inside a laptop and how to access them.Since you most likely have a different laptop, please have a look into its manual, online at the manufacturer’s website, or search Google for instructions.

Battery Pack

Most laptop batteries are unique to one model and can be expensive to replace. So if your old battery pack has some battery life left, even if it’s just an hour, someone else with the same model might actually spend a few bucks on it. Give it a try, although it’s probably best to recycle it.If you cannot sell your old laptop battery or if it’s broken, please dispose of it responsibly; batteries don’t belong into the trash.By the way, there are many ways you can increase your laptop’s battery life, although it’s an ongoing discussion whether or not it’s a good idea to remove your laptop battery to increase its life.

Power Supply

What’s true for the battery also applies to the power supply. Since the connector changes with almost every model, you won’t likely need an old power supply again once that laptop is broken. Moreover, replacing a power supply is expensive. Those are ideal conditions for the second hand market, so try and sell this part.

If the power supply is broken or doesn’t sell, do consider keeping the the power cable (left). It might fit into another power supply or device of yours.Are you wondering whether you can re-use the power supply of an old desktop computer?Yes, maybe.

RAM

Memory sticks usually are easy to remove as shown in the video above. Note that there are many different types RAM. Not only do they differ in storage capacity (measured in GB) and clock speed (measured in MHz), but also in shape, which is reflected in the name (e.g. DDR2 vs. DDR3).Since memory technology doesn’t change that frequently, you might have other devices that can use the old laptop’s RAM. For example I doubled my netbook’s RAM from 1GB to 2GB with the old 2GB memory stick from my laptop, when I upgraded my laptop with a new 8GB RAM kit. If you no longer have any productive use for those old memory sticks, either try to sell them or build your own RAM disk.

HDD/SSD

An old hard drive won’t make you a lot of money. Besides, getting your data off it beforesending it to someone else is a hassle. While an old hard drive shouldn’t be used to store any important data, it can be used to store non-essential data, for example movies or music.Fortunately, HDDs or SSDs are easy to remove and re-use. Whether you find an IDE or SATAHDD or a SSD in your laptop, you can mount it into a 2.5″ USB case and thus turn it into an external drive. A 2.5″ laptop drive in a USB enclosure is exactly what you buy as external hard, only that you already have the drive and the USB adapter is cheap.

CMOS Battery

The CMOS battery is a coin cell that sits on the motherboard and powers low-level system functions while the laptop is turned off. This little bugger is to blame when your system no longer remembers the time or when the BIOS keeps losing its settings. Those batteries are used on all computer motherboards and in many other devices and are thus worth keeping. You will not be able to sell them for much, but it’s good to have one around for emergencies. Store it in a dark, cool, and dry place.

Optical Drive

Much like an old hard drive, you can re-use your computer’s optical drive with an external USB enclosure. To get the right case, you need to identify the type of connector the CD/DVD/Blu-ray drive uses to connect to your laptop’s motherboard (IDE vs. SATA).

Display

The display potentially is the most valuable part, given it’s still in a good condition. But it’s also one of the parts that can be tough to remove. Be extra careful when removing and subsequently shipping it, LCDs are extremely fragile.

CPU

In terms of value, your laptop’s CPU is head to head with the display. This is definitely a part you should try and sell, given it isn’t permanently smoldered onto the motherboard. If you are lucky, you will find that your  laptop’s CPU is mounted into a socket that sits on the motherboard. But first you probably have to remove the passive cooling system that sits on top of it. Be careful when disassembling the cooling system and removing the CPU. Try not to touch the CPU’s pins, but instead hold the unit around the edges.

Other Parts

There are many more parts that you might be able to extract and play with, including the keyboard, touchpad, webcam, card reader, or fingerprint reader. Many of those are cheap to buy new or simply don’t break, and thus won’t sell for much. Also keeping them doesn’t make much sense, unless you have a cool project in mind. However, if there are any parts that break easily on the specific laptop model you own, for example a hinge or fan, you might actually discover a niche market for that particular part.

Leftovers

There will be parts that you cannot re-use or sell, for example parts that are broken or parts that no one needs. This may include the battery, power supply, display, the motherboard, or the plastic casing of the entire laptop. Please don’t simply trash your partially plundered laptop. Whatever is left of it still contains valuable resources that can be recovered in a recycling process.

Worldwide, many companies and stores take back old electronics and make sure they get recycled. If you’re from the US, please visit the EPA website for information on what you can do with old electronics. Cities in most European countries offer recycling stations for electronic devices. In some places you might even have a local collection bin for household electronics.

Conclusion

Even broken laptops contain a lot of valuable parts. Some are worth keeping as a backup and others can make you a little money, which you can then invest into a new device. If you’re lucky, you might make more money selling the parts of your laptop, than selling the whole functional unit.

Note that a working unit can potentially be upgraded with new parts and is good for many cool uses. More RAM and replacing an HDD with a SSD can do wonders. So unless you are eager to try out this article, try to upgrade your old hardware and meanwhile be sure not to destroy your laptop ahead of its time. Finally, a computer that no longer turns on, isn’t necessarily broken beyond repair. Before you go ahead and pick it apart, try to troubleshoot where the fault lies and you might be able to fix it.

What are the best things you could extract from an old laptop and did you use any of the low value parts for a cool project?

ARE WE USING OUR MOUSE PRODUCTIVELY?

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Back in the first days of the computer, the only way to interface with a terminal was through a keyboard, no mouse. Of course, back then, most operating systems ran on a command line interface so a mouse wasn’t really necessary. But nowadays, when we have mice available, a question is raised – are you using your mouse productively?

The mouse gives us a great deal of control in two dimensions – selecting, dragging, tapping, double-tapping, and more. However, what if you could improve your Windows mouse usage efficiency by a significant factor? If you streamline mouse control into as few actions as possible, you can really ramp up your productivity. Here’s how.

Note: Everything in this article has been tested and confirmed for Windows 7. These may or may not work in prior or future versions (e.g., XP and 8).

Streamline Mouse Shortcuts

If you’ve ever used a Windows computer, you likely know what the left and right mouse buttons do: the left click is a selection tool that allows you to drag items around while the right click opens up a context menu for more advanced actions. But did you know that Windows comes equipped with a number of other useful mouse shortcuts?

  • Ctrl + Left Click. If left clicking lets you select an item, then holding down Ctrl lets you select multiple items one at a time. This is extremely useful when you need to cut or copy a specific group of files but they’re scattered around in a huge folder of documents.
  • Shift + Left Click. If Ctrl lets you select multiple files one at a time, then Shift lets you select multiple consecutive files all at once. Basically, you left click on one file, then Shift + left click on another file, and every file between those two files will be selected as a group.
  • Shift + Left Click, again. The great thing about Shift clicking is that it works for text, too. Whether you’re in Firefox, Chrome, Microsoft Word, or wherever else, if you click somewhere and then Shift + click elsewhere, all of the text between those two points will be highlighted.
  • Ctrl + Drag. When you have a file (or multiple files) selected, you can hold Ctrl while dragging them and Windows will copy those files to the new destination.
  • Shift + Drag. When you have a file (or multiple files) selected, you can hold Ctrl while dragging them and Windows will move those files to the new destination, i.e., cut and paste.
  • Ctrl + Scroll Wheel. If your mouse has a scroll wheel  then you probably only use it to scroll through folders and webpages. If you hold down Ctrl while scrolling, though, you’ll zoom in and out. This is great for webpages that are hard to read (the text will become bigger). In Windows Explorer, the icons will become bigger.

Volumouse

How To Streamline Your Mouse Use [Windows]

Back in the first days of the computer, the only way to interface with a terminal was through a keyboard, no mouse. Of course, back then, most operating systems ran on a command line interface so a mouse wasn’t really necessary. But nowadays, when we have mice available, a question is raised – are you using your mouse productively?

The mouse gives us a great deal of control in two dimensions – selecting, dragging, tapping, double-tapping, and more. However, what if you could improve your Windows mouse usage efficiency by a significant factor? If you streamline mouse control into as few actions as possible, you can really ramp up your productivity. Here’s how.

Note: Everything in this article has been tested and confirmed for Windows 7. These may or may not work in prior or future versions (e.g., XP and 8).

Streamline Mouse Shortcuts

If you’ve ever used a Windows computer, you likely know what the left and right mouse buttons do: the left click is a selection tool that allows you to drag items around while the right click opens up a context menu for more advanced actions. But did you know that Windows comes equipped with a number of other useful mouse shortcuts?

  • Ctrl + Left Click. If left clicking lets you select an item, then holding down Ctrl lets you select multiple items one at a time. This is extremely useful when you need to cut or copy a specific group of files but they’re scattered around in a huge folder of documents.
  • Shift + Left Click. If Ctrl lets you select multiple files one at a time, then Shift lets you select multiple consecutive files all at once. Basically, you left click on one file, then Shift + left click on another file, and every file between those two files will be selected as a group.
  • Shift + Left Click, again. The great thing about Shift clicking is that it works for text, too. Whether you’re in Firefox, Chrome, Microsoft Word, or wherever else, if you click somewhere and then Shift + click elsewhere, all of the text between those two points will be highlighted.
  • Ctrl + Drag. When you have a file (or multiple files) selected, you can hold Ctrl while dragging them and Windows will copy those files to the new destination.
  • Shift + Drag. When you have a file (or multiple files) selected, you can hold Ctrl while dragging them and Windows will move those files to the new destination, i.e., cut and paste.
  • Ctrl + Scrollwheel. If your mouse has a scrollwheel, then you probably only use it to scroll through folders and webpages. If you hold down Ctrl while scrolling, though, you’ll zoom in and out. This is great for webpages that are hard to read (the text will become bigger). In Windows Explorer, the icons will become bigger.

Volumouse

Do you find yourself altering your sound levels often? I don’t suppose that it’s a very common problem, but I suffer from it and I’m sure there are a few of you out there who suffer similarly. Here’s the essence of the problem: it’s a pain to click on that tiny icon in the corner whenever you want to change up your Windows volume.

I know that there are multimedia keyboards out there that can incrementally change volume on the fly with a simple key press. Most laptops can do it, too. But if you want to do it quickly and easily using just your mouse, Volumouse is what you want.

With Volumouse, all you have to do is scroll up or scroll down (using the mouse scrollwheel) and the volume will change accordingly. You can configure the program to only change volume when scrolling under specific conditions, like when Alt is held down. Volumouse is configurable enough that you can set it to work on a per-application basis, too. On top of all that, it’s free!

AlwaysMouseWheel

Here’s a great little program that cuts out a small step in your daily computer use: instead of having to focus a window before you can interact with it, AlwaysMouseWheel lets you use the mousewheel on any window that your mouse hovers over, even if it’s not in focus. This might be a niche program, but for those who can find uses for it, it’s actually pretty neat.

Optionally, you can set it so that AlwaysMouseWheel brings the window into focus when you use the scrollwheel. It might not seem like a huge savings in time or effort, but my personal experience says that this is one of those features where you don’t realize just how great it is until it’s gone.

AlwaysMouseWheel is entirely free and requires no installation (e.g., it’s portable).

StrokeIt

For what seems like quite a while now, mouse gestures have become a feature that many recognize as the future of mouse control. I suppose the influence came from touchscreen devices that now rely on swiping and squeezing and all sorts of shenanigans to perform a great number of actions. I was never really a fan of mouse gestures.

But StrokeIt offers a mouse gesture solution that can really amp up your Windows experience. With StrokeIt, you can associate a specific mouse gesture with a particular computer command (e.g., Ctrl + Alt + K) and every time you perform that gesture, the command is executed. Gestures are performed when your hold down the right click button.

StrokeIt has some customization, too. Certain gestures can be used globally while others are only used when certain programs are in focus. You can set all of these in the preferences. Though StrokeIt comes with dozens of preset gesture motions, you can create your own as well. Highly recommended.

StrokeIt is free for personal use.

 Conclusion

For the most part, a mouse isn’t really necessary for proper computer usage. I mean, if your mouse died, you’d still be able to do 90% of what you normally do on your computer with just your keyboard: browsing, editing, shutting off, etc. But the mouse makes it all so much easier and less time consuming. If you want to ramp up your mouse efficiency, consider the tips and programs above. They’re all great and highly useful.

NOTE:- The content’s shouldn’t be used for BUSINESS purpose, a humble request.

For more info Visit www.oomikatechnology.com

If you need any help or have questions comment

Email oomikatechnology@gmail.com or oomikatechnology@hotmail.com 

SANJEEV SHUKLA

3 WAYS TO SPEED UP THE WINDOWS 7 SHUTDOWN PROCESS?

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One of the key improvements of Windows 7 is its lightning fast start-up. Aaron Dietrich of the Windows Client Performance team received a lot of praise for this achievement. However, what the developers apparently failed to optimize and speed up was the shutdown process.

Ever since I switched to Windows 7 on my laptop, which had previously shut down within seconds while running on Windows XP, the slow shutdown has been nagging me. If you also happen to be looking for ways to kick-start a Windows 7 slow shutdown, look no further! Here I will introduce you to 3 ways to optimize or speed up the logoff process, so that you can leave the office or get into bed faster.

Prologue

I tested these tips one after the other on my Windows 7 netbook (which shut down significantly faster after upgrading to 2GB RAM). I booted into Windows, started some standard programs, including Skype and Chrome with several different tabs open, waited until they had fully loaded, and then shut down the computer. In its native state, the shutdown took 32 seconds from clicking the ‘Shutdown’ button until the laptop had fully shut down.

Initial shutdown time on test machine: 32 seconds

1. Reduce Timeout To Kill Service Or App

Before Windows shuts down, it attempts to properly close all running processes. If a service doesn’t close immediately, Windows waits for a few seconds, until it prompts the user that the service is not responding to the shutdown request. The amount of this waiting time is defined by registry keys and you can reduce it.

These are two fairly harmless registry hacks. If you follow the steps outlined in this article, it should in no way harm your system. Nevertheless, I have to issue a warning:

Editing the registry can damage your operating system! I or MakeUseOf take no responsibility whatsoever!  Make a backup of your registry before continuing.

For the first hack, click the key combination > [WINDOWS] + [R], type > regedit into the text field, and click > OK to launch the registry editor.

In the registry editor, navigate to this folder:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control

Within that folder (on the right) find and double-click the string > WaitToKillServiceTimeout.

In the > Edit String window, change the > Value data from the default of 12000 (12 seconds) to 2000 (2 seconds). Click > OK to save the change.

For the second hack, navigate to the following location via the registry editor:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop

On the right, find and double-click the string > WaitToKillAppTimeout.

If this entry does not exist, you can create it. Right-click into the folder and click through >New > String Value, and name it > WaitToKillAppTimeout.

Set > Value data to 2000, click > OK.

In the same registry folder, if you see an entry called > AutoEndTasks, set its > Value data to 1, then close the registry editor.

Shutdown time: 27 seconds

2. Create a Fast Shutdown Shortcut

As of Windows 200